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Disabled Access Day: Making public spaces safer for older people

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Disabled Access Day is almost upon us. And, for the very first time, this award-winning initiative will be held across an entire weekend (10 – 12 March).

Here, we'll look at some of the initiatives arranged to mark this year's event and what you can do to support older people with disabilities.

How does Disabled Access Day support older people? 

Disabled Access Day encourages people with mobility issues to visit a new place or try a new experience they may have been unsure of previously.

Developed to celebrate and encourage good disabled access in public spaces, this initiative enables people with mobility challenges (including older people) to be more confident, active and engaged.

Kiki MacDonald, co-founder of disability-friendly access app Euan's Guide, stated: We hope many people get involved with the initiative, and feel inspired to see a part of the country they’ve never seen, or engage in activities that they don’t typically do.”

What events are planned for Disabled Access Day 2017?

A multitude of events have been scheduled to mark Disabled Access Day 2017, including:

This is just a selection of the highlights. For more information on events near you, visit the the Disabled Access Day website.

 

Improving disabled access for older people

Disabled Access Day has proved both effective and popular since it was first introduced back in 2015. But, supporting people who face mobility challenges should be an all-year-round commitment.

In honour of Disabled Access Day, here are some of the basic features that can make spaces friendlier and more accessible for people with with disabilities:

  • Adequate lighting
  • Non-slip walkways
  • Escalators/elevators
  • Safety railings
  • Ramps
  • Pedestrian crossings
  • Appropriate seating
  • Disabled toilet
  • Easy-to-read signage
  • Simple, uncluttered layout

How live-in care supports older people with limited mobility

At The Good Care Group, we're committed to supporting people facing mobility challenges.

Our specially adapted live-in care service includes a range of features designed to help older people stay as active and independent as possible, including:

  • Home-based mobility equipment needs assessment with occupational therapist
  • A supportive approach, designed to fill in the gaps rather than take over completely
  • Physiotherapy support with medically trained professionals
  • Specialist mobility risk mitigation initiatives, such as our Falls Management Programme

Find out more about how live-in care can help older people facing mobility challenges continue to play an active role in their daily routine.

 

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