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3 things to think about before caring for an elderly parent

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Caring for an elderly parent is undoubtedly a noble endeavour, but also a significant responsibility and, on occasion, not the best course of action for you or your loved one.

In this article, we'll explore three of the most significant things you should consider before deciding whether to provide ongoing care for an older parent.

What to think about before deciding on caring for an elderly parent

There is so much to think about before choosing a care model, and the route by which everyone enters care is different.

However, these are three of the most universal considerations it's worth taking into account when deciding whether caring for an elderly parent is the best option for both parties.

1) Impact on relationship

Caring for an elderly parent can dramatically change the dynamic between older parents and their children.

Having grown used to being the one who's cared for and guided by a parent, you'll need to adapt to something of a role reversal.

Some parents or children may feel that carrying out certain sensitive tasks – such as those relating to personal hygiene or finances – oversteps a boundary.

It's also important to remember that the context in which you meet will change. Rather than coming together for a special occasion or way to spend your downtime, you'll be supporting your parent in day-to-day domestic activities.

2) Medical assistance required

You'll also need to acquire the expertise and equipment to support them from a medical perspective.

This could involve a specific responsibility, such as managing their medication or assisting with a physiotherapy programme. Or, it could involve something more general, like monitoring their condition and adapting their care arrangement accordingly.

You'll need to assist in adapting their home to suit their level of mobility. You may also need to learn how to use specialist medical equipment safely.

Lastly, there's a realistic possibility that you'll need to intervene during a serious medical episode. You should, therefore, be confident that you'll be able to react in a calm, rational manner.

3) Time management

Think about the impact this arrangement could have on your daily schedule, and whether this could negatively affect your relationship.

Caring for an elderly parent is a huge responsibility that's likely to require hours of your time each day. You might be able to settle into a pattern, but the care requirement is likely to increase over time.

The care arrangement might well go beyond a daily house visit. Your loved one is likely to require support with things like hospital visits, social visits and collection of prescription medications.

With all this in mind, it's important to consider how the arrangement might impact your future. This includes areas like relations with the rest of your family, your career and scope for personal development.

Live-in care provides a personal touch

As with family-led care, live-in care helps keep older people in their treasured homes, as well as providing a welcome degree of familiarity and companionship.

Each client is able to have input into selecting a dedicated team of two live-in carers. This expert team has been comprehensively trained in a host of medical and care-related tasks.

And, with live-in care, you can focus on making the most of the time spent with your loved one, rather than getting distracted or weighed down by domestic tasks.

Find out more about live-in care today by contacting our friendly team.

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